Bible Commentaries

The People's Bible by Joseph Parker

2 Corinthians

Book Overview - 2 Corinthians

by Joseph Parker

2Corinthians

"The contents of this Epistle are very varied, but may perhaps be roughly divided into three parts:—1st, the Apostle"s account of the character of his spiritual labours, accompanied with notices of his affectionate feelings towards his converts (chaps2Corinthians1-7); secondly, directions about the collections (chaps2Corinthians8, 2 Corinthians 9); thirdly, defence of his own Apostolical character (chap. 2 Corinthians 10:1 to 2 Corinthians 13:10). A close analysis is scarcely compatible with the limits of the present article, as in no one of the Apostle"s Epistles are the changes more rapid and frequent. Now he thanks God for their general state (chap. 2 Corinthians 1:3, sq.); now he glances to his purposed visit (chap. 2 Corinthians 1:15, sq.); now he alludes to the special directions in the first letter (chap. 2 Corinthians 2:3, sq.); again he returns to his own plans (chap. 2 Corinthians 2:12, sq.), pleads his own Apostolic dignity (chap. 2 Corinthians 3:1, sq.), dwells long upon the spirit and nature of his own labours (chap. 2 Corinthians 4:1, sq.), his own hopes (chap. 2 Corinthians 5:1, sq.), and his own sufferings (chap. 2 Corinthians 6:1, sq.), returning again to more specific declarations of his love towards his children in the faith (chap. 2 Corinthians 6:11, sq.), and a yet further declaration of his views and feelings with regard to them (chap2Corinthians7). Then again, in the matter of the alms, he stirs up their liberality by alluding to the conduct of the Churches of Macedonia (chap. 2 Corinthians 8:1, sq.), their spiritual progress ( 2 Corinthians 8:7), the example of Christ ( 2 Corinthians 8:9), and passes on to speak more fully of the present mission of Titus and his associates ( 2 Corinthians 8:18, sq.), and to reiterate his exhortations to liberality (chap. 2 Corinthians 9:1, sq.). In the third portion he passes into language of severity and reproof; he gravely warns those who presume to hold lightly his Apostolical authority (chap. 2 Corinthians 10:1, sq.); he puts strongly forward his Apostolical dignity (chap. 2 Corinthians 11:5, sq.); he illustrates his forbearance ( 2 Corinthians 11:8, sq.); he makes honest boast of his labours ( 2 Corinthians 11:23, sq.); he declares the revelations vouchsafed to him (chap. 2 Corinthians 12:1, sq.); he again returns to the nature of his dealings with his converts ( 2 Corinthians 12:12, sq.); and concludes with grave and reiterated warning (chap. 2 Corinthians 13:1, sq.), brief greetings, and a doxology ( 2 Corinthians 13:11-14)."—Smith"s Dictionary of the Bible.]