Bible Commentaries

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Psalms 148

Verse 1

CONTENTS

Here is a farther continuation of the same hymn of praise. The Psalmist, in a beautiful gradation, calls upon all creation to join the song.

Psalms 148:1

The inspired writer, after opening the Psalm with Halleluiah, sets himself in order to call upon all ranks of creation to join with him in praise. He begins with the heavens themselves, those inanimate parts of God's system. Here (saith he) let Jehovah be praised. And most certainly they do praise him. Psalms 19:1-6.

Verses 2-6

He next looks to the heavenly host, angels, and the brighter order of celestial beings, who minister unceasingly to Jehovah. John in a vision, beheld the hierarchies thus engaged, and heard their songs, which the Holy Ghost was pleased to commission him to deliver to the church, Re 4 and Re 5 throughout.

Verses 7-10

From heaven, the sacred writer descends to the earth, and calls upon everything, and every object he meets with, or can recall to his mind, to join the hymn, in honour of the One glorious Lord and Maker of all.

Verses 11-13

In these verses, the sacred penman riseth to the higher order of beings upon the earth, the intelligent and rational parts of God's creation; and, in the several degrees of kings and peasants, young and old, bond and free, demands the tribute of praise to Jehovah, as to the first, best, and greatest of all Beings.

Verse 14

Lastly, he calls upon the people of God, the Israel of Jehovah, concerning whom the Lord hath said, This people have I formed for myself, they shall show forth my praise, Isaiah 43:21. And here, Reader, I pray you not only to observe the Israel of God, but the God of his Israel. Jesus is the horn of his people. And Jesus is the praise of all his saints. And if his people are near to him, as they are indeed, most near, and most dear, yet this only is in Jesus: One with him, they are near unto the Lord: they are brought nigh in his blood: they are his treasure, his jewels, his chosen, his redeemed. And well may they be called upon to praise him: for if they should hold their peace, the very stones might cry out, Luke 19:40.

REFLECTIONS

STAND still, my soul, stand still, and ponder well the weighty claims there are upon thee in this blessed Psalm. All creation, indeed, may well praise God, for God hath created, formed, and arranged them all in the beautiful and regular order in which they stand. But what can be the song of creation, compared to that of redemption, which thou art called upon to sing? God hath sent his Son to redeem thee, to save, thee, and to bring thee into everlasting fellowship, and the enjoyment of his presence and favor, in and through the blood and righteousness of his dear Son! Jesus hath died for thee, arisen for thee, answered for thee, justified thee, clothed thee, fed thee, blessed thee, and loved thee, and will love and bless thee forever. And God the Spirit hath opened to thee his precious communications of grace; quickened thee, given thee a new life in Christ, united thee to the ever blessed Jesus; and is, and will be forever, taking of the things of Jesus, to bless thee in Jesus, and to make thee a suited vessel for his glory in time, and to all eternity! Are these then the blessings of Jehovah, with which thou art distinguished? Art thou indeed among, and of the number of that people, which this Psalm records; a people near unto Him; or dwelling alone, as they are elsewhere called? Oh! think then, how thou shouldest live to his glory, to his praise, in his fear, in his love, who hath called thee out of darkness into his marvellous light! I charge it upon thee, my soul, this day, that thou live only to his praise; and that every act of thine be to his glory. Precious Lord Jesus! help me to praise thee, and to live a life of hallelujahs upon earth, until I come to shout them aloud in thy presence forever!

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Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 148 Overview". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/pmc/psalms-148.html. 1828.