Bible Commentaries

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

Psalms 28

Verse 1

CONTENTS

We have here the same speaker, under situations not unsimilar, to what went before, in the preceding Psalm. The opening of this blessed scripture, is with prayer, and the close of it, with praise.

A Psalm of David.

Psalms 28:1

It is well worthy our observation, that for the most part, in the several portions of this blessed book of the Psalms, the Holy Ghost, as if in order to lead to Christ, and that the church may not overlook him in the view of David, hath given some striking and luminous features of the Lord Jesus, by which the other characters of his person might be the easier discovered. Thus we find in the last verse but one of this Psalm, the arguments made use of for help in the former part of it, are assigned to have been because Jehovah is not only the strength of the people, but the saving strength also of his Messiah, his anointed One. Reader, I consider these lights, thrown here and there, as blessed things to guide us in our way, in our researches after Jesus. As a further confirmation, what is here said of going down into the pit, corresponds with what was prophetically spoken of the Lord Jesus elsewhere. Psalms 22:15.

Verse 2

Here also, as in numberless other instances, with an eye to Jesus, we have a lovely example, how to tell the Rock of our Salvation what our confidence is; and how to supplicate all suited grace, when we lift up our hearts, and hands, and eyes, to a God in Christ, as his holy oracle. The mercy-seat was the Old Testament propitiatory, as representing Christ. And what is the New Testament but Christ? Exodus 25:21-22. See a beautiful example of answers given from thence: Numbers 7:89.

Verses 3-5

Jesus felt this, in the days of his flesh, of the deceitfulness of men. Matthew 22:15-18.

Verses 6-9

Here is a sweet hosanna. It was first sung by Christ, and may be well sung by all his redeemed in him. Reader, do not overtook the benediction in the close of it. Is not this another view of Jesus? Remember how Aaron was commanded to bless the people, as a type of Christ, in his everlasting priesthood. Numbers 6:22, etc.

Verse 9

REFLECTIONS

Here, my soul, take a lesson from the ever blessed Jesus, David's Lord, how to cry unto God as thy Rock, thy Jesus, thy sure salvation. He will not be silent to this cry, for he hath said, Before my people call, I will answer. And learn moreover, that thine oracle, unto which thou art to approach, is a sure hearing place for poor sinners, and a sure answering place from God in Christ to poor sinners. Deliverance must come in God's own appointed time, and in the Lord's own appointed way. Let the inhabitants of the Rock, even them that inhabit the refuge in Jesus, sing.

And wilt thou not, my soul, from the beautiful example of this Psalm, close every prayer with praise? What, shall a mercy-seat ever be a witness against thee, that thou didst depart without giving thanks to the Lord? Forbid it, gracious Lord. Surely thou knowest, thou canst not indeed but know, never was a petition put up in Jesus's name unheard; neither was it ever unanswered, though not always according to our wish of things, either in time or manner, but according to God's purpose, whose promises are all yea and amen in Christ Jesus. Learn then, my soul, us one of the sweetest tokens of a spirit of grace and supplications, with thanksgiving in prayer, that blessings follow prayer, as suitably as mercies are returned to supplication. Yea, Lord, I would desire grace in all things to give thanks; and as this blessed scripture expresseth it, in this Psalm, so would I, in every renewed approach to the throne of grace, follow up the same devout doxology, and say, The Lord is my strength, and my shield: my heart trusteth in him, and I am helped; therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth, and in my song will I praise him.

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Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 28 Overview". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/pmc/psalms-28.html. 1828.