Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 8:1

Now after this it came about that David defeated the Philistines and subdued them; and David took control of the chief city from the hand of the Philistines.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Gath;   Metheg-Ammah;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Philistines, the;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Metheg-Ammah;   Philistines;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Israel;   Philistia, philistines;   Samson;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Amos, Theology of;   Israel;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Gath;   Metheg-Ammah;   Rabbah;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Cherethims;   Gath;   Metheg-Ammah;   Philistia;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Ashdod;   Geshur;   Hadad-Ezer;   Hamath-Zobah;   King, Kingship;   Metheg-Ammah;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Israel;   Metheg-Ammah;   Moab, Moabites;   Philistines;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Methegammah ;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Da'vid;   Me'theg-Am'mah;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Philistim;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - On to Canaan;   Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ammah;   Bit and Bridle;   David;   Metheg-Ammah;   Philistines;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - David;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

David took Metheg-ammah - This is variously translated. The Vulgate has, Tulit David fraenum tributi, David removed the bondage of the tribute, which the Israelites paid to the Philistines. Some think it means a fortress, city, or strong town; but no such place as Metheg-ammah is known. Probably the Vulgate is nearest the truth. The versions are all different. See the following comparison of the principal passages here collated with the parallel place in 1 Chr: -

2 Samuel 1 Chronicles 2 Samuel 8:1. - David took Metheg-ammah 2 Samuel 8:3. David 1 Chronicles 18:1. - David took Gath and her towns. 1 Chronicles 18:3. David smote Hadadezer 2 Samuel 8:4. And David took from him smote Hadarezer 1 Chronicles 18:4. And David took from him 1000 and 700 horsemen, and 20,000 foot. 1000 chariots, and 7000 horsemen, and 20,000 foot. 2 Samuel 8:6. Then David put garrisons in Syria 2 Samuel 8:8. And 1 Chronicles 18:6. Then David put in Syria 1 Chronicles 18:8. And from Betah and Berothai cities of Hadadezer. 2 Samuel 8:9. from Tibhath and Chun cities of Hadarezer. 1 Chronicles 18:9. When Toi heard that David had smitten When Tou heard that David had smitten Hadadezer 2 Samuel 8:10. Then Toi sent Joram his son Hadarezer 1 Chronicles 18:10. He sent Hadoram his son 2 Samuel 8:12; Syria and Moab 2 Samuel 8:13. - Syrians, in the valley 1 Chronicles 18:11; Edom and Moab 1 Chronicles 18:12. - Edomites, in the valley of salt, 18,000 2 Samuel 8:17. - Ahimelech - and Seraiah of salt, 18,000 1 Chronicles 18:16. - Abimelech - and Shausha was the scribe. 2 Samuel 10:16. Shobach the captain was scribe. 1 Chronicles 19:16. Shophach the captain 2 Samuel 10:17. David passed over Jordan, and came הלאמה 1 Chronicles 19:17. David passed over Jordan and came אלהם to Helam. 2 Samuel 10:18. David slew 700 upon them 1 Chronicles 19:18. David slew of the Syrians 7000 chariots of the Syrians, and 40,000 horsemen; chariots, and 40,000 footmen; and smote Shobach, etc. and killed Shophach, etc.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-8.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Metheg-ammah must be the name of some stronghold which commanded Gath, and the taking of which made David master of Gath and her towns.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-8.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

A SUMMARY OF DAVID'S MILITARY SUCCESS

During the forty-year reign of King David, he founded the Empire of Israel, which reached from Dan to Beersheba and from the Mediterranean Sea to the Euphrates River. All of the old enemies of Israel were defeated and made tributary to the king of Israel. Strong military garrisons were stationed at strategic locations throughout that vast area; and the stage was set for the magnificence and extravagant glory of the reign of Solomon.

This chapter is not a chronological report of David's victorious wars. Military operations from all parts of David's reign are included, not necessarily in any specific order of their occurrence.

There are a great many questions that arise from a comparison of this chapter with the parallel account in 1 Chronicles 18, but very few of these are of any great significance or of any particular interest to Christians. Different names for both places and persons should not be considered a problem. Many persons were known to have more than one name, and the exact location of towns, villages and other sites is, in the large picture, of no importance whatever. Besides, many places also had more than one name. This is nothing unusual. There is a town in Texas which has three names: Jake Hammond is the name of the railroad station; the Post Office is called Desdemona; and during the Oil Boom, the roughnecks for a hundred miles in all directions called it Hog Town. The place is still known by all three designations.

The problem of conflicting numbers regarding battle casualties, chariots, horses, horsemen, etc., is likewise incapable of any dogmatic solution; because, as pointed out by R. P. Smith, "Until the Arabs invented our present system of notation (numbers), the ancient methods of representing numbers were so liable to error that (in some instances) little dependence can be placed upon them."[1] It is an exercise in futility to spend much time considering such minor and unimportant discrepancies; which, in the last analysis, might have come about from damage sustained by the sacred texts which have come down through the centuries.

THE DEFEAT OF THE PHILISTINES AND THE MOABITES

"After this, David defeated the Philistines and subdued them, and David took Methegammah out of the hand of the Philistines.

And he defeated Moab, and measured them with a line, making them lie down on the ground; two lines he measured to be put to death, and one full line to be spared. And the Moabites became servants to David and brought tribute."

"After this" (2 Samuel 8:1). "This is not a temporal clause."[2] It has nothing to do with chronology. The NIV renders it, "In the course of time"; and Willis affirmed that the word "'Now' might be better."[3]

"David took Methegammah out of the hand of the Philistines" (2 Samuel 8:1). From the parallel account in 1 Chronicles 18. we learn that Methegammah (translated as, `the bridle of the mother city')[4] is actually a reference to the Philistine city of Gath and its adjacent towns. It is merely a gratuitous insult to the O.T. for any scholar to refer to that explanation in First Chronicles as only, "a brave guess."[5]

The actual meaning of Methegammah is unknown. "All of the versions are different."[6] For example, the Vulgate has, "David removed the bondage of the tribute which the Israelites paid to the Philistines."[7] Some have suggested that it might have been the name of some strategic fortress or stronghold, but, we accept the parallel explanation in First Chronicles as inspired and therefore accurate.

"Two lines to be put to death ... one line to be spared" (2 Samuel 8:2). This massacre of the Moabites by David is surprising, not only because it is so inappropriate in the conduct of one who is called, "The Man After God's Own Heart," but because David at one time had trusted the Moabites to the extent of lodging his father and mother with the king of Moab while David was a fugitive from Saul (1 Samuel 22:3-4). "Whatever the Moabites had done to provoke this action by David, must have made him very angry."[8] We do not consider it important that the parallel account does not mention this. In the total absence of any other explanation of this, we find these words from Jamieson a possible reason for what otherwise must remain a mystery: "Jewish writers assert that the cause of this particular severity against the Moabites was their having massacred David's parents and family, whom he had, during his exile, entrusted to them."[9]

The practice of killing whole armies or populations that were captured in war was widely prevalent in ancient times; but that cannot be made the justification of such a brutal and inhuman practice. "Septuagint and Vulgate versions indicate that only half the Moabites were put to death,"[10] instead of two-thirds of them as revealed in our text. Some commentators have attempted to achieve a similar percentage here by seeing a difference between the "two lines" for those executed and the "one full line" for those saved. We cannot find any such distinction. Furthermore, the text is not clear as to whether this horrible massacre was perpetrated against the whole population of Moab, or merely against their army. We cannot identify it as anything else except an example of David's rendering "evil for evil."

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-samuel-8.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And after this it came to pass,.... After David had rest from his enemies for a time, and after the conversation he had had with Nathan about building the house of God, and after the message sent to him from the Lord by that prophet, forbidding him to build, and David's prayer to the Lord upon it, the following events happened; and which are recorded to show that David's rest from his enemies did not last long, and that he had other work to do than to build the house of God:

that David smote the Philistines, and subdued them; these had been long and implacable enemies of Israel; Samson began to weaken them in his days; a war was waged between them and Israel in the times of Samuel and Saul, and the battle sometimes went on one side and sometimes on the other; but now David made an entire conquest of them: before they had used to come into the land of Israel, and there fight with Israel, but now David entered into their land, and took it from them:

and David took Methegammah out of the hands of the Philistines; the name of a province in Palestine, and from the parallel place in 1 Chronicles 18:1, it appears to be Gath, and its adjacent towns; but why that was called the bridle of Ammah, or the bridle of a cubit, as it may be rendered, is not easy to say. The conjecture of Kimchi is, that there was a pool or river of water, so Ammah is thought to signify; and Aquila renders it a water course, which passed through the city, having been brought from without it into it, the communication of which from place to place it may be David cut off, by stopping or turning its stream; but interpreters more generally suppose that Gath was built upon an hill called Ammah, see 2 Samuel 2:24; thought to be the same with the Amgaris of PlinyF4Nat. Hist. l. 5. c. 13. though that is sometimes read Angaris, a mountain he places in Palestine; and that it was called Metheg, a bridle, because being a frontier city, and being very strong and powerful, erected into a kingdom, it was a curb and bridle upon the Israelites; but now David taking it out of their hands, opened his way for the more easy subduing the rest of their country: or the word may be rendered Metheg and her mother, that is, Gath, the metropolis, since that and her daughters, or towns, are said to be taken, 1 Chronicles 18:1; and Metheg might be one of them.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-8.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And after this it came to pass, that David smote the Philistines, and subdued them: and David took Methegammah out of the a hand of the Philistines.

(a) So that they paid no more tribute.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-8.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

2 Samuel 8:1, 2 Samuel 8:2. David subdues the Philistines, and makes the Moabites tributary.

David took Metheg-ammah out of the hand of the Philistines — that is, Gath and her suburban towns (1 Chronicles 18:1). That town had been “a bridle” by which the Philistines kept the people of Judah in check. David used it now as a barrier to repress that restless enemy.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-8.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

Subjugation of the Philistines. - In the introductory formula, “And it came to pass afterwards,” the expression “afterwards” cannot refer specially to the contents of 2 Samuel 7, for reasons also given, but simply serves as a general formula of transition to attach what follows to the account just completed, as a thing that happened afterwards. This is incontestably evident from a comparison of 2 Samuel 10:1, where the war with the Ammonites and Syrians, the termination and result of which are given in the present chapter, is attached to what precedes by the same formula, “It came to pass afterwards” (cf. 2 Samuel 13:1). “David smote the Philistines and subdued them, and took the bridle of the mother out of the hand of the Philistines,” i.e., wrested the government from them and made them tributary. The figurative expression Metheg-ammah, “bridle of the mother,” i.e., the capital, has been explained by Alb. Schultens (on Job 30:11) from an Arabic idiom, in which giving up one's bridle to another is equivalent to submitting to him. Gesenius also gives several proofs of this ( Thes . p. 113). Others, for example Ewald, render it arm-bridle; but there is not a single passage to support the rendering “arm” for ammah . The word is a feminine form of אם, mother, and only used in a tropical sense. “Mother” is a term applied to the chief city or capital, both in Arabic and Phoenician (vid., Ges . Thes . p. 112). The same figure is also adopted in Hebrew, where the towns dependent upon the capital are called its daughters (vid., Joshua 15:45, Joshua 15:47). In 1 Chronicles 18:1 the figurative expression is dropped for the more literal one: “David took Gath and its daughters out of the hand of the Philistines,” i.e., he wrested Gath and the other towns from the Philistines. The Philistines had really five cities, every one with a prince of its own (Joshua 13:3). This was the case even in the time of Samuel (1 Samuel 6:16-17). But in the closing years of Samuel, Gath had a king who stood at the head of all the princes of the Philistines (1 Samuel 29:2., cf. 1 Samuel 27:2). Thus Gath became the capital of the land of the Philistines, which held the bridle (or reins) of Philistia in its own hand. The author of the Chronicles has therefore given the correct explanation of the figure. The one suggested by Ewald, Bertheau, and others, cannot be correct, - namely, that David wrested from the Philistines the power which they had hitherto exercised over the Israelites. The simple meaning of the passage is, that David wrested from the Philistines the power which the capital had possessed over the towns dependent upon it, i.e., over the whole of the land of Philistia; in other words, he brought the capital (Gath) and the other towns of Philistia into his own power. The reference afterwards made to a king of Gath in the time of Solomon in 1 Kings 2:39 is by no means at variance with this; for the king alluded to was one of the tributary sovereigns, as we may infer from the fact that Solomon ruled over all the kings on this side of the Euphrates as far as to Gaza (1 Kings 5:1, 1 Kings 5:4).

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Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/2-samuel-8.html. 1854-1889.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

We have a very different view of David in this chapter, from the view we had of him in the former. There we looked at him in his communion with God; and here, in his conflicts with men. Here are his conquests over the Philistines; the Moabites, Zobah, thy Syrians, and the Edomites. Here is also, the account of the rich gifts made to David; his courts of Justice, and his officers. So that altogether we see David here in a state of prosperity.

2 Samuel 8:1

(1) ¶ And after this it came to pass, that David smote the Philistines, and subdued them: and David took Methegammah out of the hand of the Philistines.

It should seem, that this victory of David's was fought by him. He did not, as in former battles, defend himself against the Philistines, but he went in quest of conquest. Thus, in spiritual warfares, when the Lord hath given us rest, as David had, from the enemies around, the same Lord gives us strength to wage war with the remaining Canaanites that are in the land. Let the reader remember God's promise to Israel, that he would by little and little drive out all their enemies before them; and here he will see the fulfilling of that blessed promise. Deuteronomy 7:22. Metheg-ammah, was probably so called, from having been a frontier garrison to the Philistines, and an awe upon Israel in the times of their humblings. The word Metheg, signifies a curb or bridle. Some have thought that this Metheg-ammah was Gath. Here it was, most probably, that Jonathan smote the garrison. See 1 Samuel 13:3.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-samuel-8.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And after this it came to pass, that David smote the Philistines, and subdued them: and David took Methegammah out of the hand of the Philistines.

And David took — Gath and her towns, as it is expressed in the parallel place, 1 Chronicles 18:1. Which are called Metheg-ammah, or the bridle of Ammah, Gath was situate in the mountain of Ammah; and because this being the chief city of the Philistines, and having a king, which none of the rest had, was the bridle which had hitherto kept the Israelites in subjection.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-8.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 8:1 And after this it came to pass, that David smote the Philistines, and subdued them: and David took Methegammah out of the hand of the Philistines.

Ver. 1. And after this it came to pass, that David smote.] Out of action he would not be; but seeing he might not build God a house, he would, by subduing his enemies on all hands, provide for his son Solomon both peace - the daughter of war - and spoils for materials great store. And it is observable that he assailed no nation which he overcame not, besieged no city which he took not; the same which our chronicles affirm of the Black Prince.

And David took Methegammah.] That is Gath with her precincts, [1 Chronicles 18:1] called Methegammah, or the bridle of the angle, or corner, because it kept that part of the country in awe and order. This David took from the Philistines; so hath Christ taken away the dominion of sin. [Romans 6:8-14]

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-8.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 8:1. Metheg-ammah Some learned men think this should be translated, Metheg, and her mother; i.e. the daughter and the mother city; Metheg, and Gath her metropolis: though others choose to translate these words, the bridle of the angle, apprehending that Gath was so called, on account of its being a garrison which kept all the contiguous country of Judea in awe. This is certain, that it was the metropolis of one of the five Philistine principalities, the seat of their kings, and the mother of giants.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-8.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations
on the Holy Bible

2 SAMUEL CHAPTER 8

David subdueth the Philistines and the Moabites; smiteth the king of Zobah, and the Syrians; placeth a garrison in Damascus, 2 Samuel 8:1-8. Toi sendeth Joram with presents to bless him; which with the spoil he dedicateth to God, 2 Samuel 8:9-13: smiteth the Edomites, and placeth a garrison in their land, 2Sa 14. David’s government and officers, 2 Samuel 8:15-18.

Metheg-ammah, i.e. Gath and her towns, as it is expressed in the parallel place, 1 Chronicles 18:1, which are called Metheg-ammah, or the bridle of Ammah, because Gath was situate in the mountain of Ammah; and because this being the chief city of the Philistines, and having a king, which none of the rest had, was the bridle which had hitherto kept the Israelites in subjection, but now was taken out of their mouths.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-8.html. 1685.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 8:1. David smote the Philistines, and subdued them — In the beginning of his reign they had invaded Israel twice, and were successfully repulsed. But now David invaded their country, made a conquest of it, and brought it under subjection to the Israelites. David took Metheg-ammah — That is, Gath and her towns, as it is expressed in the parallel place, 1 Chronicles 18:1, which are called Metheg-ammah, or the bridle of Ammah, because Gath was situate in the mountain of Ammah; and because this being the chief city of the Philistines, and having a king, which none of the rest had, was the bridle which had hitherto kept the Israelites in subjection.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-8.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Tribute. Aquila, and probably St. Jerome, translated, "cubit." Others suppose that Amma, or Meteg-ama, is some unknown place, which David wrested from the hands of the Philistines. It is hardly probable that the Israelites would have paid the latter tribute till the 20th year of his reign, (Calmet) or even till the 12th. (Salien) --- He might now force them to pay tribute. (St. Jerome, &c.) (Haydock) --- Perhaps a letter may have been transposed, and instead of Meteg, we should read, "Geth, the mother," or metropolis, and its dependencies; (1 Paralipomenon xviii. 1.) or "he took Metec, (Numbers xxxiii. 28.) and its mother," Geth, which reconciles the two passages. Chaldean, &c., "he deprived them of the advantage of the rivulet." Septuagint, "David took the separated" place, (Serarius) or the city of Geth. (Menochius)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-8.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

subdued. While David was victorious over enemies without, he was defeated by enemies within. See 2Sa 11 and 2Sa 12.

Metheg-ammah. 1 Chronicles 18:1 gives us the meaning, and shows that Metheg = bridle or reins, is put by Figure of speech Metonymy (of Cause), App-6, for power or government, and Ammah = mother-city: i, e. "Gath and her daughters (i.e. towns)" (1 Chronicles 18:1).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-8.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And after this it came to pass, that David smote the Philistines, and subdued them: and David took Metheg'ammah out of the hand of the Philistines.

David took Metheg-ammah out of the hand of the Philistines [ wayiqach (Hebrew #3947) Daawid (Hebrew #1732) 'et (Hebrew #854) Meteg-haa-'Amaah (Hebrew #4965)] - and David took the bridle (bit) of the metropolis out of the hand of the Philistines; i:e., he subdued the metropolis of the Philistines (Gesenius, 'Lexicon' and 'Geschichte der Hebr. Sprache,' p. 41) - that is, Gath and her suburban towns, (1 Chronicles 18:1). That town had been 'a bridle' by which the Philistines kept the people of Judah in check. David used it now as a barrier to repress that restless enemy. To the same effect Havernick renders it, 'David took the arm-bridle (the rein, of dominion) out of the hand of the Philistines.' The historian in this book records in general terms what the chronicler relates in particular detail.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(1) Subdued them.—In its connection this implies not merely the victory of a single battle, but the reversal of the former relation of the Philistines to Israel, and their reduction to a condition of inferiority and tribute.

Took Metheg-ammah.—No place of this name is known. The first word means bridle, and the other is probably, although not certainly, a derivation from the word mother, and has the sense metropolis. The translation will then be, took the bridle (i.e., the key) of the metropolis, and this seems sustained by the parallel phrase in 1 Chronicles 18:1, “took Gath and her towns (lit daughters).” Gath appears to have been already the principal among the five Philistine cities (1 Samuel 27:2), and with the rest of the country remained tributary to Solomon (1 Kings 4:21; 1 Kings 4:24).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And after this it came to pass, that David smote the Philistines, and subdued them: and David took Methegammah out of the hand of the Philistines.
A. M. 2964. B.C. 1040. An. Ex. Is. 451. And after
7:9; 21:15-22
Metheg-ammah
or, the bridle of Ammah.
2:24; 1 Chronicles 18:1-17
Gath
In the parallel passage of Chronicles, we read, "David took Gath and her towns;" and it is probable, that Gath and its districts were called Metheg-ammah in David's time; which, being unusual or becoming obsolete, in the time of the author of the Chronicles, led him thus to explain it.
Reciprocal: Genesis 19:37 - Moabites;  Genesis 22:17 - thy seed;  Genesis 27:29 - Let people;  Judges 13:5 - begin;  2 Samuel 22:38 - General2 Samuel 22:44 - head;  2 Chronicles 26:6 - the wall of Gath;  Psalm 9:5 - rebuked;  Psalm 18:38 - GeneralPsalm 18:43 - made;  Psalm 60:8 - triumph;  Psalm 68:30 - Rebuke;  Psalm 108:9 - Moab;  Psalm 118:10 - All nations;  Ezekiel 25:15 - to destroy;  Hebrews 11:33 - through;  Hebrews 11:34 - turned

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-8.html.