Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 8:11

King David also dedicated these to the Lord , with the silver and gold that he had dedicated from all the nations which he had subdued:
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - David;   Hadadezer;   Liberality;   Syria;   Zeal, Religious;   Thompson Chain Reference - Giving;   Liberality-Parsimony;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Amalekites, the;   Ammonites, the;   Brass, or Copper;   Dedication;   Gold;   Silver;   Syria;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Philistines;   Toi;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Israel;   Samson;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Amos, Theology of;   Israel;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Armoury;   Booty;   David;   Euphrates;   Hadarezer;   Moabite;   Rabbah;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Booty;   Hamath;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Dedicate, Dedication;   Hadad-Ezer;   King, Kingship;   Samuel, Books of;   Toi;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - David;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Consecrate, Consecration (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hadadezer ;   Zoba, Zobah ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Hamath;   Moab;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Hadade'zer;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - David;   Dedicate;   Gold;   Government;   King;   Psalms, Book of;   Tax;   Zobah;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Hadadezer;   Holiness;   Taxation;  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Which also King David did dedicate unto the Lord,.... He devoted it to sacred uses, particularly to the building of the house of the Lord, as he also had the gold and the brass he took from Hadadezer: together

with the silver and the gold he had dedicated of all nations which he subdued; who are after particularly mentioned; he did not convert the spoils he took to his own use, but observed the law God gave to the kings of Israel, that they should not greatly multiply to themselves silver and gold, Deuteronomy 17:17. He set it apart, and laid it up for the service of the sanctuary; and this accounts for the abundance of gold, silver, and brass, which David had amassed together, and left to his son Solomon to build the temple with; see 1 Chronicles 28:1.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-8.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Which also king David did dedicate unto the Lord — Eastern princes have always been accustomed to hoard up vast quantities of gold. This is the first instance of a practice uniformly followed by David of reserving, after defraying expenses and bestowing suitable rewards upon his soldiers, the remainder of the spoil taken in war, to accumulate for the grand project of his life - the erection of a national temple at Jerusalem.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-8.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 8:11 Which also king David did dedicate unto the LORD, with the silver and gold that he had dedicated of all nations which he subdued;

Ver. 11. Which also king David did dedicate unto the Lord.] For the building and beautifying of his temple. So did Christ, when he went forth conquering and to conquer, [Revelation 6:2] make use of the spoils he took from the world for the good of his Church, and for the building up of that spiritual temple; - the precious arts, for instance, which, as in the first plantation of the gospel in Europe, he shipped before into Greece, as his munition, meaning to send his soldiers soon after. So in the reviving of the gospel by the late happy reformation, there was sent before it as a harbinger, a general resurrection of all learning. The Greek tongue, by the sack of Constantinople, was sent by the Turk, though for no good will, into these western climates. The art of printing, which the Chinese say they had amongst them long before, was here made use of: and by that means, among other excellent books, conducing to the reformation, was published the Complutensian Bible in six volumes, A.D. 1515, at the charge of Cardinal Ximines, Archbishop of Toledo, two years before Luther stirred. An excellent work surely, and such as may well be reckoned among those means and instruments whereby the truth was restored, and Popery profligated: since both the original languages of the Bible, before only in the hands of the Jews and Grecians, together with the Chaldee, were now generally made known. Neander telleth us that that Bible, set forth by a limb of Antichrist ( ducatorum sexcentis millenis millibus impensis), was a singular help to Luther. (a)

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-8.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations
on the Holy Bible

Unto the Lord; to the building of God’s temple. So he showed his affection to God and his house, in preparing for it when he was not permitted to build it.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-8.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Metheg-ammah — Margin, the bridle of Ammah; literally, the bridle of the mother. It is not a proper name, but a figurative expression for the capital city of a province — the government of the mother city. So Gesenius and Furst. There is an Arabic proverb: “I give thee not my bridle,” that is, I do not yield the control of myself to thee. Instead of this expression we have in 1 Chronicles 18:1: Gath and her towns; Hebrew, Gath and her daughters. On this capital city of the Philistines see on Joshua 11:22. Ewald explains it as the bridle of the arm; that is, David tore from the Philistines the power by which they curbed Israel, as a rider curbs his horse by the bridle which his arm controls.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-8.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Subdued. This was the custom of most conquerors. But no prince was ever more religious in this respect than David. He had an officer appointed over the sacred treasure, which contained the presents of Samuel, Saul, &c., 1 Paralipomenon xxvi. 26, 28.

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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:11". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-8.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Which also king David did dedicate unto the LORD, with the silver and gold that he had dedicated of all nations which he subdued;

Which also king David did dedicate unto the Lord. Eastern princes have always been accustomed to hoard up vast quantities of gold (see Layard, 'Nineveh and its Remains,' 2:, p. 344). This is the first instance of a practice uniformly followed by David, of reserving, after defraying expenses, mid bestowing suitable rewards upon his soldiers, the remainder of the spoil taken in war, to accumulate for the grand project of his life-the erection of a national temple at Jerusalem.

All nations which he subdued - i:e., on the east and north of Palestine. The former comprised Amalek, Edom, Moab, and Ammon. 'The main object of David's campaign on the east of the Jordan would be to reduce the fortresses on the frequent heights (Ramoth) of Gilead, and in the rocky fortresses of the Lejah' (Porter's 'Damascus,' 2:, p. 240). 'Some of these were held by the old occupants of the country, on whose territory the Israelites were established; and they were the sources of constant danger and anxiety to the eastern tribes. These intrenched foes of the Hebrews were dislodged and subjugated. And now, garrisoned by the troops of the mighty conqueror, each fortress became the means of confirming and extending his dominions' (Drew's 'Scripture Lands,' pp. 138, 139). Thus, by the conquests of David, the Hebrews had acquired territories equal to the boundaries of the promised land, and affording all the means for accomplishing the great work assigned them. The kingdom of Israel, as now extended, comprised, besides Palestine proper, the various northern states comprehended in the beautiful and wealthy country called by the general name of Aram (Syria), where the Zobahites ruled, as far as the Euphrates; all the region east of the Jordan; the woodlands of Gilead, the fertile plains of the Hauran, and the abundant pasturage of Bashan-all north and west from Hermon, and all east from the loftiest peaks of the Hanran; all the country southeast, especially the Edomite territory, including the command of the eastern harbour of the Red Sea, and the whole line of caravan roads into Arabia, and all the Paran wilds, by which they held the avenues to Egypt, and could control the land commerce between that country and Phoenicia; in short, from Carchemish and Damascus to Elath, and the frontier of Philistia; in other words, from the river of Egypt to the great river, the river Euphrates.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) Which also.—The dedication of the gifts of Toi is especially mentioned, because these were not, like those of 2 Samuel 8:7; 2 Samuel 8:11-12, the spoils of conquered nations. David, forbidden himself to build the temple, makes every provision possible for its erection.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Which also king David did dedicate unto the LORD, with the silver and gold that he had dedicated of all nations which he subdued;
Which
1 Kings 7:51; 1 Chronicles 18:11; 22:14-16; 26:26-28; 29:2; Micah 4:13
Reciprocal: Numbers 31:28 - levy;  Joshua 6:19 - all the silver;  1 Chronicles 20:2 - and he brought;  2 Chronicles 32:23 - gifts

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-8.html.