Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 8:7

David took the shields of gold which were carried by the servants of Hadadezer and brought them to Jerusalem.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Hadadezer;   Shield;   Syria;   Zobah;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Gold;   Jerusalem;   Shields;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Philistines;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Amos, Theology of;   Israel;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Armoury;   David;   Euphrates;   Hadarezer;   Rabbah;   Rezon;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Arms;   Euphrates;   Rezon;   Zoba;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Hadad-Ezer;   King, Kingship;   Palace;   Samuel, Books of;   Syria;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - David;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Armour;   Hadadezer ;   Zoba, Zobah ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Moab;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Hadade'zer;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Palestine;   Tax;   Zobah;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Hadadezer;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

David took the shields of gold - We know not what these were. Some translate arms, others quivers, others bracelets, others collars, and others shields. They were probably costly ornaments by which the Syrian soldiers were decked and distinguished. And those who are called servants here, were probably the choice troops or body-guard of Hadadezer, as the argyraspides were of Alexander the Great. See Quintus Curtius.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-8.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And David took the shields of gold that were on the servants of Hadadezer,.... That were found with them, which they had in their hands; these must be supposed to be with the principal officers of his army; or golden chains, as Aquila, or golden bracelets on their arms, as the Septuagint; the Syriac version is "quivers of gold", such as they put arrows into, and so Jarchi and R. Isaiah understand it of such, and refer to Jeremiah 51:11; and so JosephusF18Ut supra, (Antiqu. l. 7. c. 5.) sect. 3. :

and brought them to Jerusalem; where they were laid up, and converted to the use of the sanctuary Solomon built; see Song of Solomon 4:4.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-8.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And David took the shields of gold that were on the servants of Hadadezer, and brought them to e Jerusalem.

(e) For the use of the temple.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-8.html. 1599-1645.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

Of the booty taken in these wars, David carried the golden shields which he took from the servants, i.e., the governors and vassal princes, of Hadadezer, to Jerusalem.

(Note: The lxx has this additional clause: “And Shishak the king of Egypt took them away, when he went up against Jerusalem in the days of Rehoboam the son of Solomon,” which is neither to be found in the Chronicles nor in any other ancient version, and is merely an inference drawn by the Greek translator, or by some copyists of the lxx, from 1 Kings 14:25-28, taken in connection with the fact that the application of the brass is given in 1 Chronicles 18:8. But, in the first place, the author of this gloss has overlooked the fact that the golden shields of Rehoboam which Shishak carried away, were not those captured by David, but those which Solomon had had made, according to 1 Kings 10:16, for the retainers of his palace; and in the second place, he has not observed that, according to 2 Samuel 8:11 of this chapter, and also of the Chronicles, David dedicated to the Lord all the gold and silver that he had taken, i.e., put it in the treasury of the sanctuary to be reserved for the future temple, and that at the end of his reign he handed over to his son and successor Solomon all the gold, silver, iron, and brass that he had collected for the purpose, to be applied to the building of the temple (1 Chronicles 22:14., 1 Chronicles 29:2.). Consequently the clause in question, which Thenius would adopt from the lxx into our own text, is nothing more than the production of a presumptuous Alexandrian, whose error lies upon the very surface, so that the question of its genuineness cannot for a moment be entertained.)

Shelet signifies “a shield,” according to the Targums and Rabbins, and this meaning is applicable to all the passages in which the word occurs; whilst the meaning “equivalent” cannot be sustained either by the rendering πανοπλία adopted by Aquila and Symmachus in 2 Kings 11:10, or by the renderings of the Vulgate, viz., arma in loc. and armatura in Song of Solomon 4:4, or by an appeal to the etymology (vid., Gesenius' Thes. and Dietrich's Lexicon ).

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The Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.
Bibliographical Information
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/2-samuel-8.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And David took the shields of gold that were on the servants of Hadadezer, and brought them to Jerusalem.

On the servants — Or rather, which were with the servants, that is, committed to their custody, as being kept in the king's armoury: for it is not probable they carried them into the field.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-8.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 8:7 And David took the shields of gold that were on the servants of Hadadezer, and brought them to Jerusalem.

Ver. 7. And David took the shields of gold.] As Alexander had his Argyraspides, (a) so Hadadezer his Chrysaspides; as if they had been masters of those two islands in India, called Chryse and Argyre, for the plenty of gold and silver there.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-8.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Samuel 8:7. The shields of gold See Solomon's Song, chap. 2 Samuel 4:4. Note; (1.) The enemies of God's church may associate themselves, but they shall be broken to pieces. (2.) Better to be relied on than shields of gold, is God, the shield and the defence of every spiritual Israelite.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-samuel-8.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations
on the Holy Bible

That were on the servants, or rather, which were with the servants, i.e. committed to their custody, as being kept in the king’s armory; for it is not probable they carried them into the field.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-8.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7.Shields of gold — Golden plated shields; an evidence of the wealth of the kingdom of Zobah.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-8.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 8:7. The shields of gold that were on the servants of Hadadezer — It hath been the practice of many princes to make the arms of their soldiers ornamental and precious, partly from the love of splendour and magnificence, and partly to influence the courage of those, that carried them: since nothing else could secure them from becoming a property and a prey to the enemy. Some think, however, the meaning here is, Which were with the servants; that is, committed to their custody, as being kept in the king’s armory; for it is not probable, they think, that they carried shields of gold into the field.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-8.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Arms. "Quivers," Paralipomenon and Syriac. "Bucklers," Hebrew and Chaldean. "Bracelets," Septuagint. (Calmet) --- These bucklers might be for ornament, like those of Solomon, 3 Kings x. 16. (Salien) --- They were taken afterwards by Sesac, king of Egypt. (Josephus, [Antiquities?] vii. 6.) (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-8.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

shields. Septuagint reads "bracelets".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-8.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) Shields of gold.—Solomon also “made shields of gold” (1 Kings 10:17), which appear to have been a mark of oriental magnificence. Solomon’s shields were ultimately carried off by Shishak (1 Kings 14:25-28). The LXX. has here a curious addition, saying that Shishak carried off the shields which David captured, a manifest error, since those were made by Solomon.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And David took the shields of gold that were on the servants of Hadadezer, and brought them to Jerusalem.
shields
1 Kings 10:16,17; 14:26,27; 1 Chronicles 18:7; 2 Chronicles 9:15,16
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 7:51 - things which David his father had dedicated;  2 Kings 11:10 - king David's spears;  2 Chronicles 23:9 - spears

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 8:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-8.html.