Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Galatians 5:10

I have confidence in you in the Lord that you will adopt no other view; but the one who is disturbing you will bear his judgment, whoever he is.
New American Standard Version

Adam Clarke Commentary

I have confidence in you - I now feel a persuasion from the Lord that I shall not be permitted to expostulate with you in vain; that ye will be none otherwise minded - that ye will be aware of the danger to which ye are exposed, that ye will retreat in time, and recover the grace which ye have lost.

But he that troubleth you - The false teacher, who sowed doubtful disputations among you, and thus has troubled the repose of the whole Church, shall bear his judgment - shall meet with the punishment he deserves, for having sown his tares among God's wheat.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/galatians-5.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I have confidence in you … - Though they had been led astray, and had embraced many false opinions, yet, on the whole, Paul had confidence in their piety, and believed they would yet return and embrace the truth.

That ye will be none otherwise minded - That is, than you have been taught by me; or than I think and teach on the subject. Paul doubtless means to say, that he had full confidence that they would embrace the views which he was inculcating on the subject of justification, and he makes this remark in order to modify the severity of his tone of reprehension, and to show that, notwithstanding all he had said, he had confidence still in their piety. He believed that they would coincide with him in his opinion, alike on the general subject of justification, and in regard to the cause of their alienation from the truth. He, therefore, gently insinuates that it was not to be traced to themselves that they had departed from the truth, but to the “little leaven” that had leavened the mass; and he adds, that whoever had done this, should be held to be responsible for it.

But he that troubleth you - By leading you into error.

Shall bear his judgment - Shall be responsible for it, and will receive proper treatment from you. He gently states this general principle, which is so obvious; states that he does not believe that the defection is to be traced to themselves; and designs to prepare their minds for a proposition which he intends to submit Galatians 5:12, that the offending person or persons should be disowned and cut off.

Whosoever he be - “I do not know who he is. I mention no names; accuse no one by name; and advise no severe measures against any particular individual. I state only the obvious principle that every man should bear his own burden, and be held responsible for what he has done - no matter who he is.”

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/galatians-5.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Galatians 5:10

I have confidence in you through the Lord that ye will be none otherwise minded--(Comp, Galatians 4:11-20).

The troubled Church and its troublers

I. Paul’s treatment of the Galatian Church shows us--

1. To hope the best of men so long as they are curable.

2. How are we to be hopeful of men?

3. Not to excommunicate them unless they are incurable. So long as they are curable we must use means to cure them.

II. Paul’s treatment of the troubles of this church shows us--

1. That God watches over the Church by a special providence.

2. That the apostle’s doctrine is an infallible certainty.

3. That the troublers of Churches shall be plagued by the just judgment of God. (W. Perkins.)

Bearing the judgment

The consul Q.S. Caepio had taken the city of Toulouse by an act of more than common perfidy and treachery, and possessed himself of the immense hoards of wealth stored in the temples of the Gaulish deities. From this day forth, he was so hunted by calamity, all extremest evils and disasters, all shame and dishonour, fell so thick on himself and all who were his, and were so traced up by the moral instinct of mankind to this accursed thing which he had made his own, that any wicked gains fatal to their possessor acquired this name; and of such a one it would be said, “He has gold of Toulouse.” (Trench.)

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Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Galatians 5:10". The Biblical Illustrator. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/galatians-5.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

I have confidence to you-ward in the Lord, that ye will be none otherwise minded: but he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment, whosoever he be.

I have confidence ... Paul did not believe that the Judaizers would succeed in Galatia, and they did not succeed. All efforts to meld Judaism with Christianity were thwarted and checkmated by this very epistle and other New Testament writings. See under Galatians 5:12 for comment on "in the Lord."

Shall bear his judgment ... The Judaizer (whether one or more) would bear the judgment Paul had written a moment earlier, that of being "severed from Christ," "fallen from grace," etc.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/galatians-5.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I have confidence in you through the Lord,.... Though the apostle had said many things which carried in them the appearance of roughness and severity, yet he still entertained hopes of them that they were not so far gone, but that they might be brought back again; and he here expresses his confidence of it. This confidence in them is not of faith, for no trust is to be put in men; no, not in the best; but of charity, or love, which hopes all things, and believes all things; and which proceeded upon a thorough persuasion he had, that there was some good thing in them; and therefore was confident, that he that had begun the good work would perform it, and not suffer them to be carried away finally and totally with the error of the wicked: and this confidence he had "through the Lord"; either through the Spirit of the Lord, whose office it is to lead into all truth, as it is in Jesus; and who had suggested this to the apostle, and possessed him of this confidence; so that it was not a conjecture and fancy of his, but an intimation from the Spirit of the Lord: or through the Lord Jesus Christ, or "in the Lord", Christ, as the phrase may be rendered; that is, on account of their being in Christ, which the apostle hoped and believed; where they were safe and secure from a final and total seduction; he was confident, that whatever they might seem to be now, things would take a different turn in time:

that you will be none otherwise minded; than he was, and they formerly were, when the Gospel was first preached to them, and embraced by them; and particularly in the doctrine of justification by the righteousness of Christ which was the doctrine then called in question, and in debate:

but he that troubleth you; he seems to have respect to some particular person, who was the principal of the false teachers, and most famous for his learning, knowledge, gifts, and abilities; and who had done, and was likely to do, the most mischief among them; and was a troubler of God's Israel, and of the pure waters of the sanctuary; he unsettled their minds, and caused them to halt between two, Moses and Christ, law and Gospel, and the doctrines of justification by works, and by the righteousness of Christ; the one being what gave true solid peace and comfort, the other introduced confusion, distress, and fears: the apostle threatens him, and declares that he

shall bear his judgment; or condemnation, or damnation, his punishment in this, or the other world; for the judgment, or condemnation, of such that bring in damnable harasses, and pernicious errors, lingereth not, will not be long delayed; and their damnation slumbereth not, but in a little time will seize upon them; when as they have rejected Christ as a sin bearing and atoning Saviour, and his righteousness as the justifying one, they will, agreeably to their own doctrine, be left to bear their punishment themselves, which will be intolerable, and to all eternity; nor shall any escape it,

whosoever he be; though ever so knowing and learned, and let his parts and abilities be what they will; or he be ever so famous among men, and cried up as a most excellent preacher.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/galatians-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

9 I have confidence in you through the Lord, that ye will be none otherwise minded: but he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment, whosoever he be.

(9) He moderates the former reprehension, casting the fault upon the false apostles, against whom he denounces the horrible judgment of God.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/galatians-5.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Greek, “I (emphatical: ‹I on my part‘) have confidence in the Lord with regard to you (2 Thessalonians 3:4), that ye will be none otherwise minded” (than what by this Epistle I desire you to be, Philemon 3:15).

but he that troubleth you — (Galatians 1:7; Acts 15:24; Joshua 7:25; 1 Kings 18:17, 1 Kings 18:18). Some one, probably, was prominent among the seducers, though the denunciation applies to them all (Galatians 1:7; Galatians 4:17).

shall bear — as a heavy burden.

hishis due and inevitable judgment from God. Paul distinguishes the case of the seduced, who were misled through thoughtlessness, and who, now that they are set right by him, he confidently hopes, in God‘s goodness, will return to the right way, from that of the seducer who is doomed to judgment.

whosoever he be — whether great (Galatians 1:8) or small.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/galatians-5.html. 1871-8.

Martin Luther's Commentary on Galatians

l have confidence in you through the Lord.
"I have taught, admonished, and reproved you enough. I hope the best for you."

The question occurs to us whether Paul did well to trust the Galatians. Does not Holy Writ forbid us to trust in men? Faith trusts in God and is never wrong. Charity trusts in men and is often wrong. This charitable trust in man is necessary to life. Without it life would be impossible in the world. What kind of life would ours be if nobody could trust anybody else? True Christians are more ready to believe in men than the children of this world. Such charitable confidence is the fruit of the Spirit. Paul had such trust in the Galatians although they had forsaken his doctrine. He trusts them "through the Lord," insofar as they were in Christ and Christ in them. Once they had forsaken Christ altogether, the Apostle will trust the Galatians no longer.

That ye will be none otherwise minded.
"Not minded otherwise than I have taught you. In other words, I have confidence that you will accept no doctrine that is contrary to the one you have learned from me."

But he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment, whosoever he be.
Paul assumes the role of a judge and condemns the false apostles as troublers of the Galatians. He wants to frighten the Galatians with his severe judgments of the false apostles into avoiding false doctrine like a contagious disease. We can hear him say to the Galatians: "Why do you give these pestilent fellows a hearing in the first place? They only trouble you. The doctrine they bring causes your conscience only trouble."

The clause, "whosoever he be," seems to indicate that the false apostles in outward appearance at least were very good and devout men. It may be that among them was some outstanding disciple of the apostles, a man of fame and authority. The Apostle must have been faced by this very situation, otherwise his vehemence would have been uncalled for. No doubt many of the Galatians were taken back with the vehemency of the Apostle. They perhaps thought: why should he be so stubborn in such small matters? Why is he so quick to pronounce damnation upon his brethren in the ministry?

I cannot say it often enough, that we must carefully differentiate between doctrine and life. Doctrine is a piece of heaven, life is a piece of earth. Life is sin, error, uncleanness, misery, and charity must forbear, believe, hope, and suffer all things. Forgiveness of sins must be continuous so that sin and error may not be defended and sustained. But with doctrine there must be no error, no need of pardon. There can be no comparison between doctrine and life. The least little point of doctrine is of greater importance than heaven and earth. Therefore we cannot allow the least jot of doctrine to be corrupted. We may overlook the offenses and errors of life, for we daily sin much. Even the saints sin, as they themselves confess in the Lord's Prayer and in the Creed. But our doctrine, God be praised, is pure, because all the articles of our faith are grounded on the Holy Scriptures.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website
Bibliographical Information
Luther, Martin. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Martin Luther's Commentary on Galatians". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/mlg/galatians-5.html. Zondervan. Gand Rapids, MI. 1939.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Whosoever he be (οστις εαν ηιhostis ean ēi). Indefinite relative clause with εανean and subjunctive. It seems unlikely that Paul knew precisely who the leader was. In Galatians 1:6 he uses the plural of the same verb ταρασσωtarassō and see also αναστατουντεςanastatountes in Galatians 5:12.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/galatians-5.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

In the Lord

Const. with I have confidence.

Will be - minded ( φρονήσετε )

The word denotes a general disposition of the mind rather than a specific act of thought directed at a given point. Comp. Philemon 3:15, Philemon 3:19; Philemon 4:2; Romans 8:5; Romans 11:20; 1 Corinthians 13:11: and φρόνημα mind Romans 8:6, Romans 8:7, Romans 8:27. In Class. often with εὖ well καλῶς honorably ὀρθῶς rightly κακῶς mischievously Τά τινος φρονεῖν is to be of one's party.

He that troubleth ( ὁ αράσσων )

Comp. Galatians 1:7. Not with reference to any particular individual, as Peter or James (Lipsius), but generally, of any possible person, “whoever he may be.” The verb is used by Paul only in this Epistle, and refers to disturbance of faith or unity.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/galatians-5.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I have confidence in you through the Lord, that ye will be none otherwise minded: but he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment, whosoever he be.

Yet I have confidence that - After ye have read this.

Ye will be no otherwise minded — Than I am, and ye were.

But he that troubleth you — It seems to have been one person chiefly who endeavoured to seduce them.

Shall bear his judgment — A heavy burden, already hanging over his head.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/galatians-5.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

His judgment; the just judgment of God.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/galatians-5.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Я уверен о вас. Павел снова обращает всю свою суровость на лжеапостолов, называя их причиной зла, и угрожая наказанием. О галатах же, по его словам, он питает лучшую надежду, думая, что они скоро и без помех возвратятся к истинному согласию. Ведь нас воодушевляет, когда мы слышим, что о нас надеются на лучшее. Мы считаем постыдным обмануть надежду тех, кто думает о нас по-дружески и с теплотою. Поелику же вернуть галатов к чистоте оставленного ими вероучения было делом Божиим, апостол говорит, что надеется на Господа. Этим он хочет сказать, что покаяние есть небесный дар, дабы галаты и сами испросили его у Бога.

Смущающий вас. Подтверждение предыдущего предложения, поелику апостол косвенно переносит большую часть вины на тех мошенников, которые обманули галатов. Ибо, возвещая им кару, он избавляет от нее самих галатов. И пусть это услышат все, кто дает Церкви повод для смуты, кто нарушает единство веры, уничтожает согласие; и ежели остался у них какой-то здравый смысл, пусть вострепещут от этих слов. Ибо Бог возвещает устами Павла, что не оставит безнаказанными зачинщиков подобных соблазнов. Фраза «кто бы ни был» несет в себе ударение. Ведь, поскольку лжеапостолы устрашали простой народ своей велеречивостью, Павлу, со своей стороны, надлежало премного вознести свое учение и заявить, что никто из дерзающих выступать против него, какие бы звания он ни носил, не избежит наказания.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/galatians-5.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

10 I have confidence in you through the Lord, that ye will be none otherwise minded: but he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment, whosoever he be.

Ver. 10. But he that troubleth you] That heresiarch, or ringleader of the faction. The beast and the false prophet are taken and cast alive into a lake, &c., when the common sort seduced by them had an easier judgment, Revelation 19:20-21.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/galatians-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Galatians 5:10. Will be none otherwise minded: "Will beware of this leaven, so as not to be put into a ferment, nor shaken in your liberty, in which you ought to stand fast: and, to secure it, I doubt not, (such confidence I have in you) you will, with one accord, cast out him that troubleth you. For, as for me, you may be sure I am not for circumcision, in that the Jews continue to persecute me." This is evidently the Apostle's meaning, though not spoken out, but managed warily, with a very skilful and moving insinuation. Κριμα, judgment, here seems to mean expulsion by a church censure, cutting off from church communion. See Galatians 5:12. We shall be more inclined to this opinion, if we consider that the Apostle uses the same argument of a little leaven leavening the whole lump, 1 Corinthians 5:6 where he would persuade the Corinthians to purge out the fornicator. Some, however, would extend the meaning to the solemn account which this troubler of the church's peace should give to God, and to the condemnationhe should certainly receive, if he persisted in the endeavours he was using to subvert the truth. See on 1 Corinthians 4:21.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/galatians-5.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. The apostle's holy confidence, grounded upon charity; that through the Lord, that is, through the Lord's assisting his endeavours, and through the Lord's blessing upon their serious consideration of what he had written to them they would be reclaimed from their errors, and brought to be of the same mind with himself.

Where note, How the holy and zealous apostle was divided betwixt hope and fear concerning these men; he feared the worst of these Galatians, and yet hopes the best: I have confidence in you through the Lord. It is a fault in the ministers of the gospel, when they despair of men too soon, when they cease or slacken their endeavours for their people's good, looking upon them as resolutely bent upon, and judicially given up unto, all evil. Though our apostle here had not a confidence of faith, or full persuasion, yet he had a confidence of charity, which caused him to hope that they would by like-minded with himself: I have confidence in you through the Lord, that you will be no otherwise minded.

Observe, 2. With what a holy caution, as well as Christian prudence and charity, our apostle applies himself unto them; declaring, that though he hoped they might be reclaimed from their error, yet, lest they should conclude their error not to be very dangerous, he shows them his just indignation against it, by denouncing deserved punishments against those that seduced them into it: He that troubleth you, shall bear his own judgment, his condemnation due to him in hell, without repentance, which is supposed in all threatenings. For the condition of conditional threatenings, though it is not always expressed, yet it is to be understood.

Observe, 3. The universality of the threatening: He shall bear his own judgment, whosoever he be: let him be who he will, or what he will; who he will for abilities and parts, what he will for power or reputation; whoever he is, or whatsoever he be, he shall bear his judgment. Such is the exact justice of God, and such his impartiality in the exercise of it, that he will suffer no impenitent transgressor to escape his indignation, whoever he is, without respect of persons: He that troubleth you shall bear his own judgment, whosoever he be.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/galatians-5.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

10.] “After the warning of Galatians 5:8-9, Paul assures his readers that he has confidence in them, but that their perverters shall not escape punishment. Divide et impera!” Meyer.

ἐγώ, emphatic, I, for my part; ‘quod ad me attinet, …’

εἰς, with regard to, see reff., and Bernhardy, p. 220. On ἐν κυρίῳ, see 2 Thessalonians 3:4 :—it is the element or sphere in which his confidence is conditioned.

οὐδὲν ἄλλο φρον.] See ἑτέρως, Philippians 3:15; of which this ἄλλο is a kind of softening. We take the meaning here to be, ye will be of no other mind than this, viz. which I enjoin on you,—not in Galatians 5:8-9 only, but in this Epistle, and in his preaching generally.

ὁ δὲ ταράσσων need not be interpreted as referring necessarily to any one ἐπίσημος among the Judaizers (as Olsh., al.), but simply as individualizing the warning, and carrying home the denunciation to each one’s heart among the perverters. Cf. οἱ ἀναστατοῦντες below, and ch. Galatians 1:7; Galatians 4:17.

τὸ κρῖμα, the sentence, understood to be unfavourable, is a burden laid on the judged person, which he βαστάζει, bears. The ὅστις ἐὰν ᾖ generalizes the declaration to the fullest extent: see ch. Galatians 1:8-9.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/galatians-5.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Galatians 5:10. After the warning in Galatians 5:8-9, Paul now assures his readers how he cherishes confidence in them, that their sentiments would be in conformity with this warning; but those who led them astray would meet with punishment.

ἐγώ] with emphasis: I on my part, however much my opponents may think that they have won over your judgment to their side. Groundlessly and arbitrarily Rückert affirms that what Paul says is not altogether what he means, namely, “I indeed have done all that was possible, so that I may be allowed to hope,” etc.

εἰς ὑμᾶς] towards you. Comp. Wisdom of Solomon 16:24. Usually with the dative or ἐπί.

ἐν κυρίῳ] In Christ, in whom Paul lives and moves, he feels also that his confidence rests and is grounded. Comp. Philippians 2:24; 2 Thessalonians 3:4; Romans 14:14.

οὐδέν ἄλλο] is referred by most expositors, including Luther, Calvin, Winer, Rückert, Matthies, Schott, Olshausen, Baumgarten-Crusius, de Wette, Ewald, to the previous purport of the epistle generally as directed against Judaism. But what is there to warrant this vague reference? The warning which immediately precedes in Galatians 5:8-9 (not Galatians 5:7, to which Wieseler, Hofmann, and others arbitrarily go back) has the first claim to have οὐδέν ἄλλο referred to it, and is sufficiently important for the reference. The antithesis δὲ ταράσσων also suits very appropriately the subjects of that warning, πεισμονή and ζύμη, both of which terms characterize the action of the seducers. Usteri interprets: that ye will not allow any other than your hitherto subsisting sentiments.” No, a change, that is, a correction of the sentiments previously existing, is precisely what Paul hopes for.

φρονήσετε] ye will have no other sentiments (the practical determination of thought). The future (comp. Galatians 6:16) refers to the time when the letter would be received. Hitherto, by their submissiveness towards those who were troubling them, they seemed to have given themselves up to another mode of thinking, which was not the right one ( ἄλλο, comp. Lys. in Eratosth. 48; ἕτερος is more frequently thus used, see on Philippians 3:15).

δὲ ταράσσων ὑμᾶς] The singular denotes not, as in 2 Corinthians 11:4, the totum genus, but, as is more appropriate to the subsequent ὅστις ἄν , the individual who happened to be the troubler in each actual case. Comp. Bernhardy, p. 315. The idea that the apostle refers to the chief person among his opponents, who was well known to him (Erasmus, Luther, Pareus, Estius, Bengel, Rückert, Olshausen, Ewald, and others; comp. also Usteri),—formerly even guessed at by name, and identified with Peter himself (Jerome),—has no warrant in the epistle. See, on the contrary, even Galatians 5:12, and compare Galatians 1:7, Galatians 4:17.

ὅστις ἂν ] is to be left entirely general: without distinction of personal position, be he, when the case occurs, who he will. The reference to high repute (Theodoret, Theophylact, Luther, Estius, and many others; including Koppe, Flatt, Rückert, de Wette) would only be warranted, if ταράσσ. applied definitely to some particular person.

τὸ κρῖμα] the judicial sentence κατʼ ἐξοχήν, that is, the condemnatory sentence of the (impending) last judgment. Comp. Romans 2:3; Romans 3:8; 1 Corinthians 11:29. Of excommunication (Locke, Borger) the context contains nothing.(229)

βαστάσει] the judicial sentence is conceived as something heavily laid on (2 Kings 18:14), which the condemned one carries away as he leaves the judgment-seat. The idea of λαυβάνειν κρῖμα (Romans 13:2; James 3:1; Luke 20:47, et al.) is not altogether the same.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/galatians-5.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Galatians 5:10. ἄλλο, different) from what [“none otherwise minded” than as] I write.— φρονήσετε, you will think) when you read these things; comp. Philippians 3:15.— δὲ, but he who) A distinction is drawn hereby between the seducer, of whom there is less hope, and the seduced.— ταράσσωνκρίμα, ὅστις, troublethjudgment, whosoever) ch. Galatians 1:7-8.— βαστάσει, will bear) as a heavy burden.— τὸ κρίμα, the judgment) which certainly hangs over him for so great a crime. The article gives force to the meaning.— ὅστις ἂν , whosoever he may be) The disturber among the Galatians was a clandestine one. ὅστις, whosoever, of whatsoever character.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/galatians-5.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations
on the Holy Bible

I have confidence in you through the Lord, that ye will be none otherwise minded: the apostle (according to his usual method) sweeteneth his sharp reproof of this church for their deviations from the faith of the gospel, with a declaration of his good opinion of them; declaring that he had a confidence in them, that through the grace of God they would be reduced to the truth, or kept from wandering from it, and that in matters of faith they would be all of the same mind.

But he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment, whosoever he be; and for those who endeavoured to seduce and pervert them, God should reward them according to their works. He seems to aim at some particular false teacher, (whose name he concealeth), who gave this church this trouble.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/galatians-5.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

уверен о вас Павел выражает ободряющую уверенность в том, что Господь не допустит, чтобы Его наследие впало в явную ересь. См. Ин. 6:39, 40; 10:28, 29; Рим. 8:31-39; Флп. 1:6, 7. Они устоят и будут сохранены (Иуд. 24).

осуждение Всех лжеучителей постигнет суровое и вечное осуждение. См. пояснения к 2Пет. 2:2, 3, 9.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/galatians-5.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

None otherwise minded; that they would, on reflection, agree with him in this matter.

He that troubleth you; by propagating error.

Bear his judgment; receive punishment.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Family Bible New Testament". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/galatians-5.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

John Eadie's Commentary on Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians and Philippians

Galatians 5:10. The apostle so far modifies his statement, or rather expresses a confidence that the whole lump will not be so leavened. Still there is no connecting particle; each statement stands out vividly by itself-

᾿εγὼ πέποιθα εἰς ὑμᾶς ἐν κυρίῳ—“I have confidence in” or “toward you in the Lord.” The emphatic use of the pronoun ἐγώ is, “I for my part.” There is a tacit contrast to what goes before, which some copyists filled in by δέ, as in C1, F, and which Lachmann so far acknowledges as to put it within brackets in his text. The verb is used with ἐπί and an accusative- ἐφ᾿ ὑμᾶς- 2 Thessalonians 3:4, 2 Corinthians 2:3; it has also, as here, the momentous adjunct ἐν κυρίῳ, in Philippians 2:24, 2 Thessalonians 3:4; with a different aspect of relation it is also followed by ἐπί with a dative, 2 Corinthians 1:9, Hebrews 2:13, and by the simple dative, Philippians 1:14, 2 Corinthians 10:7, which designates the region or ground of confidence. εἰς ὑμᾶς is “in reference to you.” Wisdom of Solomon 16:24; Winer, § 49, a, c; Bernhardy, p. 220. He based his confidence not on his own pointed reproof, solemn expostulation, or tender reminiscences; not on their affection toward him, or their probable recognition of the truth and reappreciation of it when they should bethink themselves. He might not overlook those elements indeed, but he says boldly, ἐν κυρίῳ. Compare Romans 14:14. We have in these three verses in succession, πείθεσθαι.- πεισμονή- πέποιθα. His confidence was-

῞οτι οὐδὲν ἄλλο φρονήσετε—“that ye will think nothing different”-that is, that ye will be of the same mind with me. Acts 28:22; Philippians 1:7; Philippians 3:15. The reference seems directly to be to what he has been enjoining and illustrating in the previous sections; but as that includes the germ of his preaching, the inference is fair, that the entire circle of the apostle's public instruction is comprehended. We do not, like Ellicott, make the last the immediate reference; nor does the use of the future justify the supposition, for it naturally refers to the period when the epistle should be read, not excluding, of course, the anticipated and lasting result.

The apostle's confidence was, that the persuasive arts of the Judaizers should fail; that their success should be only temporary; and that the mass, after the novelty had worn off and they had come to themselves, should be of his mind-should settle down into harmony with him in reference to all the distinctive or characteristic truths of the gospel which he had proclaimed. See under Philippians 3:15.

The apostle has been verging for some time toward the next declaration-the stern censure of the false teachers-

῾ο δὲ ταράσσων ὑμᾶς βαστάσει τὸ κρίμα—“but he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment.” The δέ marks a contrast between the apostle's confidence in returning harmony of opinion with himself, as just expressed, and the perversions and disturbances created by the Judaists. The singular ὁ ταράσσων is not collective for οἱ ταράσσοντες (Galatians 1:7), nor is it used as representing a class. Winer, § 27; 2 Corinthians 11:4. Nor, probably, does it specify any particular individual or any well-known person directly, as Erasmus, Bengel, Usteri, and others suppose; for the ὅστις ἂν ᾖ generalizes the expression. The phrase simply takes an individual of a class, and holds him up for the moment to notice, so that what is true of him is true of the entire party of which he is the representative. Madvig, § 14. It matters not-

῞οστις ἂν ᾖ—“whoever he may be.” Acts 3:23. There is in this clause no direct reference to personal character, relation, or state, though they may be all included. The common reference has been to station-high station; as by Theophylact and Theodoret- μεγάλοι, ἀξιόπιστοι, and they are followed by Luther, Rückert, and De Wette. The sentiment may be true, but it is not directly expressed. Whoever he may chance to be-no matter what his position, influence, or pretensions-he shall bear his judgment. Lightfoot's filling up, “however he may vaunt his personal intercourse with the Lord,” is a very unlikely supposition. Some, according to Jerome, found in this clause a quiet reference to Peter.

βαστάσει τὸ κρίμα. κρίμα is the judgment or sentence-whatever its nature-pronounced by the κριτής, and by contextual reference it is here a condemnatory judgment. Romans 3:8. We have λαμβάνειν κρίμα in Luke 20:47, Romans 13:2, James 3:1. In the Septuagint it represents the Hebrew נָשָׂא, H5951 in its various senses. Compare 1 Corinthians 11:29, 1 Timothy 5:12. The image of a load in βαστάσει is found in Hebrew usage. Locke, Borger, and Macknight regard the κρίμα as excommunication; Jatho refers it to other church penalties, and placing a comma after φρονήσετε, he supposes the apostle to express his confidence that the church would agree in judgment with him against the offenders; but the apostle refers the judgment to God- ἀνταπόδοσις θεοῦ (Hesychius). Tischendorf writes ἐὰν, after A, B, א. See on this spelling, Winer, § 42, 6; Hermann, ad Viger. 835. κρίμα is accented κρῖμα in classical writers. See under Galatians 2:9. Lipsius, Grammatische Untersuchungen, p. 40.

The apostle immediately adds-

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Eadie, John. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". John Eadie's Commentary on Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians and Colossians. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jec/galatians-5.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘I have confidence towards you in the Lord that you will not be of another mind, but he who troubles you will bear his judgment, whoever he is.’

But Paul now assures them that he is confident that they will come well out of this because they are in the Lord’s hands. His confidence is primarily in the Lord, but also in them. This will hopefully soften their hearts to what he has been saying.

On the other hand he is confident that the one who is troubling them will be dealt with by God. This verse (‘whoever he is’) may suggest that there may have been one major figure, along with his companions, who was responsible for the problems.

‘Will bear his judgment.’ They will have to give account to God. Compare Romans 14:10-12.; 1 Corinthians 3:10-15.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/galatians-5.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Galatians 5:10. I have confidence toward (or in regard to) you in the Lord, etc. Paul hopes that the Galatians will return from their error, and this hope is grounded in his communion with Christ in whom he lived and moved. Comp. Philippians 2:24; 2 Thessalonians 3:4; Romans 14:14.

He that troubleth you, all the false teachers. Comp. Galatians 5:12; 2 Corinthians 11:4.

Shall bear his judgment, God’s judgment of condemnation. Comp. Romans 2:3; Romans 13:2; 1 Corinthians 11:29. The guilty must ‘bear’ the sentence as a burden.

whosoever he be, whatever be his character and position. (Jerome thinks even of Peter, but without any good reason; for Peter agreed with Paul in principle and failed only in practice at Antioch.)

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/galatians-5.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Galatians 5:10. The emphatic with which this verse opens reminds the converts of the Apostle’s personal claims in the Lord on their allegiance. He reckons with confidence on their support in pronouncing the judgment of their church on any who may disregard this warning. Every offender shall bear his own responsibility, whoever he may be.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/galatians-5.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

have confidence. Greek. peitho, as above.

in = in regard to. Greek. eis. App-104.

through. Greek. en. App-104.

Lord. App-98.

none = nothing. Greek., oudeis.

otherwise. Greek. allos. App-124.

minded. Greek. phroneb. See Romans 8:5.

troubleth. Greek. tarasso, as in Galatians 1:7.

judgment. Greek. krima. App-177.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/galatians-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I have confidence in you through the Lord, that ye will be none otherwise minded: but he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment, whosoever he be.

Greek, 'I (emphatic: "I on my part") have confidence IN [ en (Greek #1722)] the Lord (the ground of confidence) with regard to [ eis (Greek #1519)] you (2 Thessalonians 3:4), that ye will be none otherwise minded' (than what by this letter I desire you to be, Philippians 3:15) [ heteros (Greek #2087): but here allo (Greek #243) phronein (Greek #5426).]

But he that troubleth you (Joshua 7:25; 1 Kings 18:17-18; Acts 15:24; Galatians 1:7). The article has a selective and definitive force; the one who, for the time being, calls forth Paul's censure as the troubler (Ellicott) (Galatians 4:17).

Shall bear - as a heavy burden.

His - the judgment he deserves; namely, excommunication (Galatians 5:12): an earnest of God's judgment (Romans 2:3). Paul distinguishes the case of the seduced, misled through thoughtlessness, who, now that they are set right, he confidently hopes, will return to the right way, from that of the seducer doomed to judgment.

Whosoever he be - whether great (Galatians 1:8) or small.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/galatians-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) I have confidence in you through the Lord.—Literally, I have confidence wish regard to you in the Lord—i.e., such confidence as a Christian teacher ought to have in Christian scholars. This has reference to the main body of the Church; an exception is immediately made as to the disaffected party, and especially their leader.

That ye will be none otherwise minded—i.e., no otherwise than I would have you be.

Shall bear his judgment.—“Judgment” is here not equivalent to “condemnation.” He shall be “put upon his trial,” “shall bear the sentence that shall be passed on him”—viz., by God.

Whosoever he be.—The Apostle does not fix upon any one particular person as the cause of the troubles in the Galatian Church, but he says that, whoever he may be, God will judge him.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/galatians-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I have confidence in you through the Lord, that ye will be none otherwise minded: but he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment, whosoever he be.
confidence
4:11,20; 2 Corinthians 1:15; 2:3; 7:16; 8:22; 2 Thessalonians 3:4; Philemon 1:21
but
1:7; 2:4; 3:1; 4:17; 6:12,13,17; Acts 15:1,2,24; 1 John 2:18-26
bear
12; 1 Corinthians 5:5; 2 Corinthians 2:6; 10:2,6; 13:10; 1 Timothy 1:20
whosoever
2:6; 2 Corinthians 5:16
Reciprocal: 2 Corinthians 2:5 - any;  2 Corinthians 11:20 - if a man bring;  Philippians 1:6 - confident;  Philippians 3:15 - be thus

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/galatians-5.html.

Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books

I have confidence in you through the Lord, that ye will be none otherwise minded: but he that troubleth you shall bear his judgment, whosoever he be.

Paul leaves this false teacher to his judgment before the Lord, and trusts that the Galatians will understand that leaven needs to be removed before it does its damage.

1 Peter 5:1-4 relates to this as well as Hebrews 13:17.

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Derickson, Stanley. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/sdn/galatians-5.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10.I’ but—Mark the antithesis of this verse. I have confidence in you, the lump; but woe to the little leaven, the disturbers. Paul says this partly to soften his tone to the Church, and partly to induce a division between the Church and its seducers.

Have confidence—His purely personal feeling, expressed as strongly as he was able. It expressed no inspired assurance that they would prove true, nor any theological dogma that all Christians do persevere.

In you—Wavering as you show yourselves.

Through the Lord—Literally, in the Lord. Same sense as in Ephesians 6:1.

Confidence in’ the Lord, is simply not inspired but Christian confidence. Had there been a failure it would have proved St. Paul’s human fallibility, but would not have disparaged his inspiration or apostleship. Far less does it imply that the Lord inevitably secures the perseverance of all who put their faith in him.

Otherwise—Than your acceptance of my gospel.

He that troubleth you—Not necessarily, but probably, the one leader and head of the schism.

Bear his judgment— Divine condemnation, which, for so grievous a sin, would be grievous to bear.

Whosoever he be—Even though he came from Jerusalem and pretended to be commissioned by James the apostle. All this is too pointed and severe not to indicate an individual.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/galatians-5.html. 1874-1909.

The Bible Study New Testament

10. But Istill feel sure. “I do not want you to think you are beyond God’s reach. I still have confidence in you, because of our union in the Lord. But God will punish the man who is upsetting you by the things he teaches!”

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/galatians-5.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

10.I have confidence in you. All his fierceness is again directed against the false apostles. To them the evil is traced, and on them the punishment is threatened. Good hopes are expressed regarding the Galatians, that they will quickly and readily return to a sincere belief. It gives us courage to learn that good hopes are entertained about us; for we reckon it shameful to disappoint those whose feelings towards us are kind and friendly. But to bring back the Galatians to the pure doctrine of faith, from which they had turned aside, was the work of God. The apostle says that he has confidence in them , ἐν Κυρίῳ, through the Lord, by which he reminds them that repentance is a heavenly gift, and that they must ask it from God.

He that troubleth you (86) The sentiment which he had just delivered is confirmed by thus indirectly imputing the greater part of the blame to those impostors by whom the Galatians had been deceived. From the punishment denounced against them, the Galatians are very nearly exempted. Let all who introduce confusion into churches, who break the unity of faith, who destroy their harmony, lend an ear to this; and if they have any right feeling, let them tremble at this word. God declares, by the mouth of Paul, that none “through whom such offenses come” (Luke 17:1) will pass unpunished. The phrase, whosoever he be, is emphatic; for the high sounding language of the false apostles had terrified the ignorant multitude. It became necessary for Paul to defend his doctrine with corresponding warmth and energy, and not to spare any one who dared to raise his voice against it, however eminent or however distinguished.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Galatians 5:10". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://beta.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/galatians-5.html. 1840-57.