Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Thursday, July 14

664
Death of Deusdedit, the sixth Archbishop of Canterbury.
1558
Bishop Bonner has Robert Miles, Stephen Cotton, John Slade, Robert Dynes, William Pikes, and Stephen Wight burned at the stake. The case is especially notorious because the six had been guilty of no more than praying and reading the Bible while no longer considering themselves Catholics. Furthermore a note from Bonner "scribbled in haste" will later be found requesting permission (apparently from Cardinal Pole) to burn them at Brentford, Essex, where it can be done more quickly and quietly than at St. Paul's Cathedral, because imprisoning the six at his house has become an inconvenience.
1575
Death of Richard Taverner, a Bible translator and reformer in England.
1775
Anglican clergyman and hymnwriter John Newton wrote in a letter: 'The knowledgeof God cannot be attained by studious discussion on our parts; it must be by revelation onHis part.'
1792
Samson Occom's wife finds him dead, having collapsed as he walked back to his house after writing an article in his study. Occom had been a notable evangelist among American Indians, a hymnwriter, and the principal fundraiser for the college which became Dartmouth University.
1800
Birth of Anglican clergyman Matthew Bridges. In 1848 he converted to Catholicism,under the influence of the Oxford Movement in England. He is remembered today for authoringthe hymn, 'Crown Him with Many Crowns.'
1809
Death of Nikodemos of the Holy Mountain, a champion of contemplative prayer and the co-compiler (with Macarius of Corinth) of the Philokalia (Love of the Good), an anthology of spiritual writings by monks from the desert fathers to Gregory Palamas.
1833
Anglican clergyman John Keble preached his famous sermon on national religiousapostasy. It marked the beginning of the Oxford Movement, which sought to purify andrevitalize the Church of England.
1849
Theodore Fliedner escorts four deaconesses to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where three days later a deaconness home will be solemnly dedicated, the beginning of the Lutheran deaconess work in the U.S. from which will spring many deaconness hospitals.
1857
Forty-seven-year-old Ting Ang, a trader in Fuchau, China, is baptized on this day, the first Methodist convert in China.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"